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Rustbelt Resurrection?
Feb 15th, 2017 by LOONEYEXECUTIVE

Blake Glenn’s Looney thoughts, perspectives, adventures, and insights on the world of business!

— By Blake Glenn

 

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Hello 2017!

It’s my first post of 2017. I’ve been away a little while. During my long hiatus I helped a family member close a deal to sell a property, moved many heavy items,  took some much needed rest, discovered I need shoulder surgery (after moving many heavy items), and Donald Trump was elected President of the U.S. All of those things are true.

All. Of. THEM.

But in my near endless quest for uncovering interesting items happening in the business world, I came across an opinion piece in USA Today written by Steve Case, co-founder of AOL. For the last two years, through his Rise Of The Rest tour, Case has crisscrossed the U.S. in search of tech startup communities beyond Silicon Valley, Boston and New York City. In previous posts I refer to such cities and regions as “Outside The Valley”.

In any case, Case has spent time in a few cities that have been devastated by the decline of industrial age industries. And he has some interesting points to make about the growth of tech startups in there. Some of those key points include:

 

  • Globalization and technology are irreversible forces
  • Massachusetts, New York, and California account for 80% of venture capital investment
  • Responsibility for changing the funding dynamic starts with Silicon Valley and NY tech leaders and venture capitalists
  • Rise of the Rest cities are often too risk-averse and lack the fearlessness of Silicon Valley
  • Nascent entrepreneurial communities are often fragmented
  • Government, legacy companies and tech need to invest in unleashing America’s creativity

 

I just want to comment briefly about some of his points. First, I understand his belief that VCs need to redirect their investment resources to non-traditional cities. In fact, it may make good business sense to scour the entire country seeking out investment opportunities rather than just a select three or four cities. But that takes time, effort, and connections even for large VC firms.

So why would a VC seek out tech startups in, say, Dayton, OH, if there doesn’t already exist a strong tech startup community led by entrepreneurs? It’s the responsibility of the entrepreneurs in those regions to build their communities into viable, attractive cites whether VCs recognize them or not.

Case mentions that many cities are too risk-averse and lack fearlessness. As someone that led a tech startup Meetup group for 3 years in Dayton, I can testify to that fact. The mentality, not just of the institutions and general community, but of the people claiming to be entrepreneurs can be so damned oppressively conservative and failure-averse.

Finally, Case makes a good point about the fragmentation within many tech communities. While I led that tech startup group I attempted to organize a gathering for all leaders of regional tech groups. While my group focused specifically on tech startups there were many other groups focused on some particular technology or tech-related expertise. I contacted leaders from 17 or 18 groups in SW Ohio. We only had about five groups represented. To top the cake, the majority didn’t even respond to my invitation, including at least 3 that I already knew or had met previously. Not even a freakin’ no – just silence. And I sent at least two notices.

What Case found out during his Rise Of The Rest tour is what I learned during my three years of Meetup group dictatorship:

 

Cities with a traditional industrial base or dependence on a very narrow range of declining industries need a lot of time, patience, vodka and Tylenol as they seek to re-invent themselves into emerging tech startup hubs.

 

It’s been a little over a year since I shuttered IgniteTech, the tech startup group I founded. Over the next few weeks I’ll start posting my reflections and that adventure.  I think I’ll call it “Surviving The Rustbelt”. Catchy title huh. Then again maybe not. I’m not completely sure I’ve survived it yet. Can someone pleeeaasseee hand me a bottle of Vodka. Actually … better make it the whole case. It’s gonna be a long story.

 

Blake Glenn shares his looney perspectives, stories, and mis-adventures in The Looney Executive blog. He has interviewed hundreds (or at least tens) of people via  The Looney Executive Podcasts and former TV show. He’s the founder of a tech group called IgniteTech, and claims to be a direct descendant of the original Looney Executive – Because there must be SOME explanation … right?

 

If you dare, I can be reached the old school way … blake@LooneyExecutive.com

 

P.S.  I’m actively recruiting test contestants for my business game show experiment. Interested? Please contact me so I can add you to the player pool!

 

 

The Destruction Of A Brand!
Nov 8th, 2016 by LOONEYEXECUTIVE

Blake Glenn’s Looney thoughts, perspectives, adventures, and insights on the world of business!

— By Blake Glenn

 

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A Brief Rant From the Looney Executive Business Files … 

 

Today is election day – November 8, 2016. And at this most critical time in U.S. history, I have a perspective to share.

First of all this is a sort of stream-of-consciousness post. It’s not filled with facts and fancy statistics and credible references. It’s just my thoughts and opinions on a subject that I’ve found quite fascinating as I’ve watched the presidential race unfold, then drag on. And that is … the Donald Trump brand.

This isn’t about politics. Well ok maybe it is kind of. But it’s not about the presidential race itself. This is about business.

You see my focus is on the happenings in the looney world of business and commerce. And from a business perspective it’s been pretty interesting to watch the effect on Trump’s brand as he has pursued his political ambitions. It’s been a wacky ride indeed.

Frankly I think the Donald Trump brand has eroded significantly in recent years. And it’s due primarily to his foray into the political arena. There are so many things he’s said and done that singularly may not have necessarily created significant long-term damage. But collectively these have gathered into a celestial fireball aimed dead square at his brand and net worth (which still remains a mystery). Here are just a few of Trump’s blunders that have contributed to the Trump brand decline:

 

  1. Leading the “birther” movement against President Obama (and continuing way beyond all reason and rationality)
  2. Insulting his political opponents, media members, and anyone else he felt disagreed with him
  3. Insulting John MaCain for “getting captured” in Vietnam
  4. Insulting the parents of a Muslim soldier killed in battle
  5. Being caught on tape describing creepy, predatory, and illegal behavior toward women
  6. Not releasing his tax returns as all presidential nominees have done for several election cycles
  7. Being exposed as a deadbeat by former small business vendors that he failed to pay
  8. Renewed analysis of the bankruptcies of Trump business entities
  9. Having his multiple business launches and failures exposed by various publications
  10. Insulting Latino immigrants
  11. Insulting a disabled reporter
  12. Insulting a baby (no – I. Am. Not. Kidding!)

 

The list seems like a lot doesn’t it? But as I stated, those are just a few of the more notable examples. These behaviors in a private executive suite would be aggregious enough. But in a presidential race where every word, hell every syllable and every letter in a word, is publicly scrutinized, those are brand-killing blunders. His behavior should also have been the death knell of his political campaign. But this is a bizarro year in politics. A year where we all seemingly woke up one day in a world that resembled our own but was off by some fraction, just enough to make us say, “Oh SHIT! Is this real?”.

By the way, failures in business are simply a part of the entrepreneurial lifestyle. Usually that shouldn’t be held against any entrepreneur, including Trump. However, a key part of his brand are the “winner” and “success” stories that he touts. Most of the time he seems to downplay or outright dismiss any talk of his failures.

And one of Trump’s big problems is that while most of the customers of his branded properties and products (hotels, casinos, golf courses, steaks) tend to be high-income individuals, those attracted to his politics tend to come from the middle- and lower-economic stratus that can’t afford his prices. And as reported by Fortune.com and ABC News, there does seem to be a clearly identifiable erosion in his brand among those high-end customers that may last for years to come after this election is over.

Whether Donald Trump wins or loses the presidential election, it looks like he may have already lost his brand value advantage. All of this was avoidable. As far as maintaining his brand value, he shouldn’t have run for president. Any idiot knows that political races today receive more media coverage (print, radio, network TV, cable TV, Internet, Martian laser transmissions) than at any time in history. So why, with all of his baggage and personality flaws, would Donald Trump even run for president?

Well … ego-mania of course. Ego-mania is a condition that can not only be a deal killer. As we’ve witnessed in this presidential election cycle, it can be also be a weapon of mass destruction for valuable brands. Only time will tell how much destruction Trump has caused to his brand and how long, if ever, it will take to make a full recovery.

 

 

Blake Glenn shares his looney perspectives, stories, and mis-adventures in The Looney Executive blog. He has interviewed hundreds (or at least tens) of people via  The Looney Executive Podcasts and former TV show. He’s the founder of a tech group called IgniteTech, and claims to be a direct descendant of the original Looney Executive – Because there must be SOME explanation … right?

 

If you dare, I can be reached the old school way … blake@LooneyExecutive.com

 

P.S.  I’m actively recruiting test contestants for my business game show experiment. Interested? Please contact me so I can add you to the player pool!

 

 

“Ready for What’s Next”: A Gig Love Story
Sep 13th, 2016 by LOONEYEXECUTIVE

Blake Glenn’s Looney thoughts, perspectives, adventures, and insights on the world of business!

— By Blake Glenn

 

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In 2008, shortly after being laid off from a brief part-time stint marketing for a small tech firm, I got a call from a placement company called Aquent. Like many placement firms, or “body shops” as some call them, Aquent matches talent with contract assignments at companies that need their expertise. And Aquent specialized specifically in placing “creative talent”.

After spotting my TV show and podcasting experiences on Monster.com, an Aquent rep contacted me. I’ll call her Susan. I think that may have been her actual name. But it’s been a few years and I’m not foolish enough to wager next month’s rent payment on that flimsy bit of speculation. So with my TV and podcast background, Susan thought I’d be a great fit for this gig.

In this case, the client in question was Booz Allen Hamilton, a big-time consulting firm based in the sprawling Virginia suburbs of Washington, DC. A couple of marketing managers at Booz Allen were seeking help with their projects – one with a web video series and the other with a podcast show. Each manager worked with a different Booz Allen group and planned to feature internal experts in these video and podcast episodes.

Both of these projects needed an executive producer. And I was the man for the job. In essence I would be the guy that led these projects from the nascent idea stage to shining new finished digital media product. So I drove from Maryland out to the section of Northern Virginia where both Aquent and Booz Allen were located – Tyson’s Corner.

 

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If you love food and shopping, Tyson’s Corner is your absolute consumer Shangri-La, a mythical place filled with delicious ethnic foods, endless displays of designer clothes, multi-level shopping malls as far as the eye can see. You’ll even spot the occasional unicorn – usually sporting the latest designer trends, such as the Beyonce Unicorn Hat. But with a mighty burst of willpower I managed to fend off the temptation and make my way to the meeting with Susan.

She informed me about the project preliminaries, her Booz Allen clients, and of course Aquent. Susan was very nice and quite informative. I then had a meeting with the two Booz Allen marketing managers. The meeting went great! I touched on my expertise with producing a TV show and podcast and how I could successfully produce their respective projects. I was truly excited about this.

Then I waited … and waited. There were no calls. No emails. No smoke signals. No Morse code messages. Nothing. A few weeks went by with no word from Booz Allen. Susan assured me they were interested. But I thought maybe they found someone else they liked better. Perhaps our first date was better for me than it was for them. I was the anxious potential lover waiting for the follow up phone call that never came.

My ripe optimism slowly faded as the time ticked away. Naturally I thought it was over. So I decided to temporarily leave the cramped bustling DC-VA-MD metroplex for the wide open rustbelt allure of southwestern Ohio. I was contemplating my next move, there was no word from Booz Allen, and Thanksgiving was coming up. So I decided to just get an early start on spending the holidays with the family.

Sometimes though … sometimes when we think we’re making plans for ourselves, destiny intervenes, says “I Don’t Think So”, and makes plans on our behalf. A few short days after my arrival in Ohio, the clients called Susan with the great news. They wanted me to start as soon as possible. They just had to figure out some budgetary and other internal issues before launching the projects. Well of course. I knew that. I never had any doubt what-so-ever of their interest in me. So I gladly piled into my 2002 tan Buick LeSabre  (is there any other color?) and drove the 500 monotonous miles back to the DC suburbs.

I started the project about 3 weeks before Christmas. The web video series we created was called “Ready for What’s Next”. It would be a slate of short webisodes featuring Booz Allen consultants discussing key topics critical to their corporate and government clients. As the executive producer, my duties included:

 

  • Helping develop the web series idea
  • Helping develop the budget
  • Creating the series format
  • Scripting the interview questions
  • Prepping Booz Allen experts for their interviews
  • Vetting, helping to select, and managing the video production vendor
  • Helping to select the intro music

 

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In the end, we created 40(+) webisodes of 1 minutes to 5 minutes in length. Unfortunately, that podcast show never came to fruition. That was fine with me. In retrospect it was much better for me to focus on producing the web video series. The project downside was that I had to listen to dozens of music pieces before the final selection was made for the intro music. I must have listened to “the chosen one” at least 100 times as we reviewed the videos. And I couldn’t get that damned music out of my head for an entire year.

But even now I look back at that gig as an all-time favorite. It was love at first sight. The gig was short, only three months. But it was one of the most fun and interesting assignments in my career, especially since I spent most of the time working from home, barely out of my PJ’s, sipping hot morning coffee with a little extra – Bailey’s, Amaretto and Kahlua. It’s not every gig where you can become intoxicated by noon and still keep your job.

Sweeeet!

 

P.S.   In the event that your life has ground to a boring, meaningless, screeching halt, you can click here to see some of those exciting Booz Allen Mission Integration videos. Enjoy!

 

………………..

 

Blake Glenn shares his looney perspectives, stories, and mis-adventures in The Looney Executive blog. He has interviewed hundreds (or at least tens) of people via  The Looney Executive Podcasts and former TV show. He’s the founder of a tech group called IgniteTech, and claims to be a direct descendant of the original Looney Executive – Because there must be SOME explanation … right?

 

If you dare, I can be reached the old school way … blake@LooneyExecutive.com

 

P.S.  I’m actively recruiting test contestants for my business game show experiment. Interested? Please contact me so I can add you to the player pool!

 

 

LA ON Fire – Part II
Jul 6th, 2016 by LOONEYEXECUTIVE

Blake Glenn’s Looney thoughts, perspectives, adventures, and insights on the world of business!

— By Blake Glenn

 

Upon my arrival in LA, as always the tall palm trees, bright sunshine, and pollutant-infused smog embraced me with open arms. But, unfortunately, for the next week I wouldn’t see much of them. My immediate destiny was to be holed up deep within the bowels of the GAO office, leading efforts to turn around our fast disintegrating hopes for the $5,000,000 tech project.

When I got to the office I hit the ground running. I immediately set up a meeting with the client staff to hear their grievances. We held the meeting in the large conference room. It was windowless, barren, cold, grey, lacking in anything approaching personality, completely soulless.  It was an appropriate scene for the hellish torture I was set to endure.

All of the client stakeholders were present. Having all of them present was critical. Some of these people may have had their careers tied to this project. And even the least powerful among them still had influence and could make our team’s life miserable with their discontent and dozens of small complaints, a death by a thousand tiny cuts.

I should have put on my toxic substance defense suit because the shit began flying immediately. While I wasn’t the reason for their travails, I was now the onsite representative of the enemy. And as such, I was now the one bright red target upon which to vent their unending anger.

 

………………..

 

The grievances were many. That the new network installation wasn’t going well was an epic understatement. There were lots of bugs. That happens all the time of course. Things never go the way you expect. And like roaches in real life, you could quash a few here and there, but you could also rest assured that they would pop up somewhere else. Again. And again.

The situation was exacerbated by the engineers and technicians whose poor attitudes angered the GAO staff . The techies didn’t communicate well about problem resolutions. They didn’t respond quickly to information requests. And most damaging of all, they were simply rude to the customers, treating them like uninformed idiots that didn’t deserve the tech’s time.

My employer had made a big mistake too. They had left a hard core network engineer named Terry in charge of the onsite team. They could not have chosen a worse candidate. He was a very good network engineer, maybe even superb. But his people and management skills were non-existent. He was rude, short-tempered, and thin-skinned.

He was the Donald Trump of the geek world. But this was my employer’s fault more than Terry’s. They knew about his “personality flaws”. He should have never been the onsite team lead in the first place. But, in a moment of weakness, they acquiesced to his desire to be the man.

The other techs followed behind him because, well, he was in charge. But they weren’t happy. The customers were haranguing them relentlessly, not due to their own ineptitude but due to his. And the team recognized Terry’s inadequacies. They were ready for a change. When I arrived, the GAO villagers were so incensed with Terry that they were gathering torches and pitch-forks and descending upon the tech castle to drive him out of the building. And I think each and every one of our team members was ready to join them!

I acted quickly to take control and try to put things on the right track. Here’s what I did:

  • Immediately met with client staff as a means for them to vent their anger, frustration, and grievances. I mostly listened, and listened, and listened
  • Inserted myself between all tech personnel and client staff. There needed to be a buffer or cushion between these two groups and I had to be it
  • Immediately removed Terry from his position and made sure the other team members knew who was in charge … Me. The boss had already made everyone aware that I was now in charge. But that was a mandate from almost 3,000 miles away. I reinforced that mandate upon my arrival and included the boss in our meetings via conference call
  • Set up war room complete with crisis board to manage each problem
  • Enacted an emergency project management plan
  • Set up hierarchy to prioritize each problem
  • As a public relations move, had tech’s quickly fix a handful of small but lingering problems to show progress and ease tensions, i.e., killed several roaches quickly
  • Set up morning, mid-afternoon, and end-of-day progress briefings with client staff as a means to keep the client close to the activity. Only included techies that were necessary for updates and answering technical questions. Kept their client interaction time to a minimum.
  • Held tech staff briefings three times daily … about 30 minutes to 1 hour before client briefings
  • Threatened to drive Terry to the high open desert and remove his man-parts, Game-of-Thrones style, and feed them to the rattlesnakes if he came close enough to even breath the same air as any member of the client staff

 

Of course none of these items were rocket science. They weren’t that innovative. They weren’t going to change the world. They were all mostly just practical common sense actions needed to turn around this failing project, especially the Game-of-Thrones technique.

 

………………..

 

The primary requirements to do my job were pretty simple:

  1. Organization and project management;
  2. Thick skin to take all of the heat from the client … and my team members;
  3. Great communications skills;
  4. Ability to seamlessly transform at a moment’s notice between being a soothing “crisis whisperer” to a tough but fair ass-kicking leader;
  5. Sense of humor – seriously, some things you just gotta laugh at;
  6. Ability to combine individual profane words and phrases into new semi-lucid profanity strings targeted at non-compliant members of my team. This was a last resort of course, but proved unusually effective when used sparingly and with precision. As effective in many cases also was the strategic use of profane hand and finger movements and gestures.

 

And, while not flawless, the tactics worked. Within a week we had saved the LA project, which helped to renew confidence in my employer, which helped save the other regional GAO installations, which means we rescued about $5,000,000 in revenue for my employer. I was proud of the team coming together under my leadership to make this happen. But it was a team effort. They just needed the right leader. I didn’t have to Game-of-Thrones Terry’s man parts … unfortunately. And my boss was able to maintain his golf privileges.

The trip wasn’t all work though. One upside of that adventure was that my girlfriend-of-the-time lived in the Los Angeles area. Though we amicably went our separate ways soon after this trip, it was certainly good to see her.

Frankly though, I couldn’t understand why she brought her good male friend with her each time we met. It was good to see that she had a friend out there. Who says men and women can’t just be friends. I guess he needed her support. Going through a difficult time according to her. And he was strong. Lots of muscles. I knew she was safe. She later got married and had kids. I never met her husband. But the kids kind of looked like that guy. What a coincidence. I wonder if they’re still friends.

 

Want to catch up on Part I? Just click here!

 

………………..

 

Blake Glenn shares his looney perspectives, stories, and mis-adventures in The Looney Executive blog. He has interviewed hundreds (or at least tens) of people via  The Looney Executive Podcasts and former TV show. He’s the founder of a tech group called IgniteTech, and claims to be a direct descendant of the original Looney Executive – Because there must be SOME explanation … right?

 

If you dare, I can be reached the old school way … blake@LooneyExecutive.com

 

P.S.  I’m actively recruiting test contestants for my business game show experiment. Interested? Please contact me so I can add you to the player pool!

 

 

LA On Fire – Part I!
Jun 30th, 2016 by LOONEYEXECUTIVE

Blake Glenn’s Looney thoughts, perspectives, adventures, and insights on the world of business!

— By Blake Glenn

 

In mid-June, 1995 at approximately 8:29 am EST, on a typical sunny-hazy day, a major fire broke out in downtown Los Angeles, California. The sparks from this blue-hot blaze had been smoldering at a low level for about 10 days and now threatened to burst into an inferno and engulf the U.S. GAO building. The GAO was the Government Accounting Office.

 

An aside … As a result of a brilliant and strategically considered rebranding effort, in 2004 the “A” was changed from Accounting to Accountability. Yay!

 

This was not one of the ubiquitous 100-times-a-year forest fires indigenous to Southern California. No. This one was special. It was entirely contained within the GAO building. But if not contained, it threatened to leap-frog across the U.S. and spread to Atlanta, Washington, DC and other regional offices of the GAO.

Let me set the stage for this story.

You see I was working on-site as a contractor at the U.S. GAO Washington, DC headquarters. Our mission was to maintain the information technology system at the HQ as well as several field office locations around the country. Our services included installation, help desk support, repairs, maintenance, disaster recovery, and training. In total, the contract was worth about $5,000,000.

In 1995 the contractor I worked for was in discussions with the GAO for renewal and expansion of said contract. When you’re in a contract renewal year it’s like being a professional athlete in your last contract year. You want to have a great year. Be on your best behavior. Do a great job to try to ensure another big contract to keep the money rolling in. Those titanium golf clubs don’t buy themselves you know.

Needless to say, the higher-level, and by default, mid-level managers were all in a tizzy, as would be expected. The prospect of losing country-club memberships would panic even the most fearless individual. My employer implemented a secret plan send a specialist with a particular set of skills to address the situation.

Me.

And after conducting a bit of clandestine research, putting myself and those I love in dire danger, I was able to uncover the original transcript from the top-secret 1-on-1 crisis meeting with my boss, the project manager at U.S. GAO HQ in Washington, DC. Below I’ve provided a complete un-redacted original transcript.

………………..

 

8:47 am EST: Boss called into office of GAO division director in Washington, DC to get an earful on a critical situation developing in Los Angeles, CA

9:17 am EST: Boss asks to meet me in large GAO conference room … alone

9:23 am EST (I had to make a bathroom stop): Boss provides overview of the critical situation in Los Angeles

 

Full Transcript (un-redacted):

 

Boss: I need you Blake.

Me: Of course. How can I help sir?

 

Boss: We have a major situation in LA. A raging fire has broken out at the GAO regional office there. And I’m not so sure we can contain it. It’s bad. Real bad. Our entire tech contract is in deep shit. That’s $5,000,000 ready to go poof!

Me: Hmm. I see sir. How did this happen?

 

Boss: The geeks. Those damned geeks. No people skills. They ran wild. Talking to the customers like they were idiots. Not fixing problems in a timely fashion. They’re utterly out of control. They’ve fucked it all up! Damnit. Damn. It!

Me: I agree. That’s a bad situation sir. And by geeks I assume you primarily mean Terry, the onsite project manager.

 

Boss: Yes, Terry. Blake you’re our best hope. Hell you’re our only hope at this point. You’re the sole individual that can drag us out of that quagmire. Without you I’m afraid this contract will be lost. It’s worth $5,000,000 you know. We can’t lose it. You have to save it for us. It funds my country club membership. We have to focus on the real important things in life right?

Me: What? That’s a lot of pressure sir. By myself I don’t know if I can …

 

Boss (interrupting): We’re depending on you Blake. I mean TOTALLY. DEPENDING. ON. YOU. We really are. I need you to fly into LA and fix this freakin’ mess.

Me: Of course sir. I’ll do my best. But …

 

Boss (interrupting): No buts. I mean butts are fine. I like butts a lot, just not as part of this conversation. Just make this happen. And here may be a pony in it for you if you can pull off this miracle. You like ponies don’t you?

Me: Silence. Bewilderment. Staring. Mouth open.

 

Boss: Well don’t you?

Me: Uh. I don’t know. I never …

 

Boss (interrupting): Of course you do. What a stupid question. We all like ponies.

Me: Ok sir. I can see you’re under a lot of pressure. Are you ok?

 

Boss: How about a pink one. I think I can make that happen. You like pink do you?

Me: Pink? What?

 

Boss: Pressure! You have no freakin’ idea. I picked a helluva day to stop taking my pain killers recreationally.

Me: Ok. Ok. I’ll go to LA and do my best sir.

 

Boss: Of course. Your best is all I can ask for. That and fixing this mess of course. And saving my golf privileges. We can’t forget what’s important here. Am I right?

Me: No. I’m not promising …

 

Boss (interrupting): So that’s it then. It’s settled. You’ll fly out and deal with it. I already have you booked on a flight.

Me: What? When?

 

Boss: Two hours . You better get moving.

Me: Two hours! Sir what the fu…

 

Boss (interrupting): Excellent! I knew you’d be excited and want to leave right away. You’re my main man. By the way, does my golf swing look correct? Look at this.

Me: You son of a …

 

Boss (interrupting): No reason to thank me! You know I’m an unsentimental fool. When you reach LA be sure to check in straight away. Now off you go. You’re the man!

 

………………..

 

And with that I raced home, quickly packed, and caught a taxi to Washington National Airport. The 8-hour trip to Los Angeles, including the layover, flew by (no pun intended … ok it really was) rather quickly. I had a little time to prep myself for the hellish, toxic environment I was about to walk into – angry clients, battered tech staff, low morale on both sides, and the prospect of losing a $5,000,000 contract.

After a good night’s sleep, the last one I’d have for several days, I stepped onto pavement directly in front ofthe downtown Los Angeles GAO office. It was 8:00 am sharp. I quickly glanced the bright yellow shape in the sky, adjusted my red power tie, took a deep breath, opened the glass door, and walked head-first into the raging inferno inside.

 

For the rest of the story please read part II of LA On Fire!

 

………………..

 

Blake Glenn shares his looney perspectives, stories, and mis-adventures in The Looney Executive blog. He has interviewed hundreds (or at least tens) of people via  The Looney Executive Podcasts and former TV show. He’s the founder of a tech group called IgniteTech, and claims to be a direct descendant of the original Looney Executive – Because there must be SOME explanation … right?

 

If you dare, I can be reached the old school way … blake@LooneyExecutive.com

 

P.S.  I’m actively recruiting test contestants for my business game show experiment. Interested? Please contact me so I can add you to the player pool!

 

 

Turnarounds 101 – The Bare Basics!
May 18th, 2016 by LOONEYEXECUTIVE

Blake Glenn’s Looney thoughts, perspectives, and insights on the world of business!

— By Blake Glenn

 

I’m not an expert in the “art of the turnaround”. Not by any means. But as an outside advisor, I’ve had more than my share of brushes with troubled small businesses. I’ve had about 8 brushes as a consultant. I’ve had one inside experience as a part-time employee. And on one occasion I even parachuted into a hot mess to lead a tech “project turnaround” that was instrumental in my then-employer retaining a valuable contract with the U.S. government.

All of those situations were different of course. But almost all of them shared a handful of common traits:

 

  • Revenue declining
  • Profits evaporating
  • Customers fleeing
  • Low employee morale
  • Frantic owners/executives nearly paralyzed with fear and shock
  • No crisis or turnaround strategy as far as the eye can see

 

And the reasons that small businesses find themselves in the midst of a quagmire aboard a rapidly sinking ship are also diverse. Some common reasons include:

 

  • Loss of key customer(s) or contract
  • Entry of aggressive new competitor(s)
  • Industry-wide decline
  • Catastrophic outlier event (9-11 attacks, 2008 recession, Hurricane Katrina … etc.)
  • Management ineptitude or malfeasance
  • Loss of key employee(s)
  • Selling commodity products

That last one, commodity products, is a particular killer. It’s way too common in the world of small ventures. You provide a product or service that’s totally indistinguishable from many others available to customers. So rather than try to understand any obscure minute differences between the products (if any exist at all), customers simply shop for the lowest price.

 

And voila. There go your profit margins!

Captain … Iceberg straight ahead!

 

Small ventures have it tough I tell you. They have much less room for error than the troubled mega-businesses that often make the cover of Forbes magazine and the Wall Street Journal. Mega-companies such as IBM, Sears, and GM on the other hand, can go through several management teams over a period of years and still remain standing, though perhaps in a more deteriorated state. And unlike some mega-firms, small and mid-sized businesses aren’t too big or too important to fail. So government bailouts are nowhere to be seen in times of crisis.

But while each turnaround or crisis situation is unique, there are some general tactics you can implement to get a handle on the things.

 

Do An Assessment

Assess your cash flow. Do projections to get a clear picture of what’s going out and what’s coming in … and the timing for outflow and inflow. If you’re in an immediate crisis do this weekly. Also start regularly monitoring your income statement and balance sheet. Understand your key ratios and monitor them diligently. Assess your debt. What is owed to whom and for how much?

Also assess your management team. Are they equipped to deal with the crisis? What changes can be made to strengthen the team? Assess your employees. Maybe one or two of them can step into key roles on the turnaround team.

 

Stop/Minimize the Bleeding

This means try to minimize your losses by such methods as cutting costs, reworking debt payments if possible, and incentivizing quicker customer payments. You might also delay making payments to some vendors in order to temporarily help cash flow.

 

Communicate

… with employees, key customers, lenders, and investors if you have them. Aprise them of the situation. And let them know how you plan to deal with the crisis. Get them on board early, especially employees. Let them know that their help is critical to your survival. Employees need their jobs, though some will almost certainly have to be let go. Customers need their products, though but maybe not from you if you sell commodities. And lenders want their money back.

 

Create a Turnaround Team

Launch a crisis team that includes one or two employees, not just managers or executives. Keep the team small. You must move quick and with urgency. And unwieldy committees notoriously move slowly. Appoint a turnaround manager that has the final say. This may be the owner, CEO, a founder, or other executive. Sometimes an outside turnaround manager is necessary, if you can afford it, because their judgment isn’t clouded by an emotional attachment.

 

Develop a Turnaround Plan

Create a strategy to survive and turn the ship around. Create goals and deadlines. Assign tasks. It’s just like a project plan, because, well, it is! Execute swiftly. Be flexible as things change and may call for different tactics than you thought.
These are just a few general tips on how to approach a basic turnaround. Of course each situation is unique. But these will at least get you going in the right direction.

And if you want to read an interesting and funny story about one of my turnaround experiences take a look at my post Jimmy’s Descent Into Hell.

Take care and watch out for those icebergs!

 

 

Blake Glenn shares his looney perspectives, stories, and mis-adventures in The Looney Executive blog. He has interviewed hundreds (or at least tens) of people via  The Looney Executive Podcasts and former TV show. He’s the founder of a tech group called IgniteTech, and claims to be a direct descendant of the original Looney Executive – Because there must be SOME explanation … right?

 

If you dare, I can be reached the old school way … blake@LooneyExecutive.com

 

P.S.  I’m actively recruiting test contestants for my business game show experiment. Interested? Please contact me so I can add you to the player pool!

 

 

The Case Of The Missing Equity! … Part II
Mar 9th, 2016 by LOONEYEXECUTIVE

A true story taken from the (Mis-)Adventures of The Looney Executive.

 

If you missed The Case Of The Missing Equity – Part I, it might help to catch up on the chaos of this tale and then come back for the rest!

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………….

So all of that insanity set the stage for a chaotic, unfocused, middling, small business pursuing government contracts. Having advised a handful of distressed small businesses I’d become somewhat of a distressed biz profiler. I’d seen the story before. And the evidence was laid out in plain sight for all to see.

 

  • No core strategy.
  • No focus.
  • Poor leadership.
  • No bread and butter clients (i.e., clients that brought consistent revenue).
  • No nothing else that was superior or unique or special that could be exploited.
  • Chaos all around.

 

Since he and I shared an office I’d been talking to him on a daily basis. I knew the strategy because I was helping to develop it, or at least I tried. He changed it almost weekly. This was an act of desperation. And I understood. I’d been in the desperate zone myself. But my strongly encouraged advice of developing and executing a core strategy went unheeded.

One week the focus was on applying for government certifications. The next it’s on contract bidding for items outside of his niche. We bid on a few contracts. Won none of them. Winning government contracts is a volume game. The competition can be fierce. So in order to be successful, you need to produce lots of proposals. It was a jungle where only the strongest, and best-connected, could thrive. We also discussed a few unique ideas that we could launch. These were ideas that would bring his thinking more in line with that of a tech startup founder. But Ricky just wasn’t of the mindset to think, and act, too creatively. On top of it all, Ricky was focused on his PhD studies. So he’d spend large parts of days doing school work and not addressing the severely damaged ship careening toward a fiery crash.

And yet part of the promo (before I arrived) included such typical and overused mantras as “highest quality”, “number one company”, “most experienced” … huh?

Even with that I was a little surprised when one day, out of the blue, he broke the news of layoffs for some of his small staff, including me. My surprise was not the layoff itself, but that he didn’t give a heads up, and frankly that it didn’t happen sooner. But he offered what he thought was a carrot to keep us engaged. He offered us an equity stake but …

 

There was no “there” there.

There was nothing original that was being produced.

There were no long-term contracts.

There were no patents or other valuable intellectual property.

There was no A+ management team.

 

And there was a lack of trust too.

On more than one occasion Ricky told a staff member that paychecks were on the way when they hadn’t even been mailed yet. He was buying time. Not communicating with staff. Operating on the edge. Sometimes when the landlord came by to collect, Ricky would pretend to not be there. Why the landlord felt the need to collect in person was an interesting phenomenon in itself. Perhaps he too had been told one time too many times that the check was in the mail.

As the team gathered in a meeting to discuss this dire situation, I just asked a couple of entirely reasonable questions. I didn’t want to say outright that equity-for-work was a damned horrible idea and embarrass him. But I needed to know. When I asked the legitimate question of how much he currently valued the company, he blurted out an exorbitantly high number. When I followed up with the question of how he arrived at that number, he became a bit irritated and defensive. He said that he could create any value he wanted.

Clearly he was delusional. I didn’t see this as an outright attempt at fraud. He was desperate. He wanted to think that his hard work over the years translated into something of great value. Unfortunately, like for most of the hard-working 49er’s of the California gold rush, it didn’t.

This model he’d chosen to pursue was a dead end. He may get a few contracts here and there. But without a clear focus, a good strategy, and great leadership he was destined to pilot this ship aimlessly through the coldness of space until it eventually simply crashed.

 

After evaluating the situation my advice was simple:

  • Shoot this miserable, suffering beast as a means to a merciful death.
  • Kill it quickly and decisively. He, and it, would not have to suffer any more.
  • Get a job. Save money. Pay off the bills.
  • Develop better ideas.
  • Start fresh in a couple of years.
  • Better yet, pursue acquisitions as a path back to entrepreneurship.

 

But if he was crazy enough to keep going as a startup entrepreneur … start over with a core strategy around one or two unique ideas in a space that was not a low-profit, commoditized jungle.

Ricky did get a job for a while. But, ignoring my advice, he kept the company open for business doing the same thing. A couple of years later, after I was gone from the DC area, he told me he had moved into a new office park. Same business model though. I always wish him the best. I hope he succeeds.

But the old saying is true … sometimes you just can’t teach a stubborn old dog new tricks.

 

Blake Glenn shares his looney perspectives, stories, and mis-adventures in The Looney Executive blog. He has interviewed hundreds (or at least tens) of people via  The Looney Executive Podcasts and former TV show. He’s the founder of a tech group called IgniteTech, and claims to be a direct descendant of the original Looney Executive – Because there must be SOME explanation … right?

 

If you dare, I can be reached the old school way … blake@LooneyExecutive.com

 

P.S.  I’m actively recruiting test contestants for my business game show experiment. Interested? Please contact me so I can add you to the player pool!

 

 

The Case Of The Missing Equity! … Part I
Mar 1st, 2016 by LOONEYEXECUTIVE

A true story taken from the (Mis-)Adventures of The Looney Executive.

 

Way back in 2008 I worked briefly for a very small tech company. The founder, and sole owner, was a friend of mine. We met in college. Let’s call my friend Ricky. Over the years Ricky and I both tried our hand at entrepreneurship. His sole focus has been on trying to build a company around bidding for government contracts. He didn’t have a “Silicon Valley” mindset. He wasn’t focused on developing original, “disruptive” ideas that targeted a unique “space” and led to billion dollar IPOs – just simply bidding on government contracts. The DC/Northern Virginia/Southern Maryland region is ripe with so many entrepreneurs chasing the same elusive but potentially profitable dream.

At the time, Ricky desired someone to come in and provide a much needed dose of strategy and marketing for his fledgling, middling enterprise. So he asked me to help out. Over the years, as we discussed our entrepreneurial adventures, I never got a clear sense of his focus. And when I actually went inside the company I saw some things that surprised me. First, he wasn’t running his business full time. He was actually working for a large aerospace company part time. In understood this of course. You have to pay bills. And he had kids to support. But he was driving to Philly for his job. That was a 2-hour drive one way. Good thing it was part-time.

Secondly, he was bidding on supplying low-margin, commodity electronic items of all types to government agencies. As I found out in short time, literally anyone could do this. Being an expert in electronics was unnecessary. Just connect with a distributor, set up in your home, go to certain web sites for the solicitations, apply for a certification or two, put pen to paper (metaphorically of course) to bid for contracts, and voila! – you were a new very low-overhead competitor. The barriers to entry were pretty non-existent. So, because he leased a fair amount of office space, Ricky was already at a disadvantage.

Thirdly, a massive storm cloud had overtaken his operations. Let me explain. Shortly before I arrived, there was some major internal drama. Ricky fired one of his employees. Let’s call her Diane. Diane had set up her own operation using HIS equipment in order to compete against him for the same bids. But wait, there’s more.

Diane was also the sister of Ricky’s former long-time girlfriend (and mother of his 3 children), Tanya. Tanya also worked for Ricky. And she had convinced him to hire her sister Diane against his better judgment. Diane had been relieved of her previous job under cloudy circumstances. It appeared to be some level of financial misconduct, maybe embezzlement. This woman already had a history of corrupt-minded activities, which is why Ricky didn’t want to hire her. But he did it to appease Tanya. Tanya thought it would be a fresh start for Diane. Well as the saying goes, it’s hard to teach an old crook new tricks, unless they’re crooked tricks.

After Diane’s treachery, the nuclear fallout from this fiasco also emptied into family relationships as Diane and Tanya went on the warpath against each other, dragging their siblings and parents into the fray. Those extended family gatherings must have been so very interesting.

And there was a bit more intrigue going on that Ricky had actually created himself. On behalf of his employer, his job was to work with small businesses that provided products and services to the company. Over time he developed relationships with several vendors. One of those vendors built proprietary cables for Ricky’s employer. One day the owner decided to sell his little venture. And Ricky decided to buy it … without his employer’s knowledge. In short time his employer discovered that Ricky had acquired one of its small suppliers. So this employer was paying him, already an employee, to make cabling products for them through the guise of the company he acquired.

And how did they find this out?

Well Diane of course. She called and told them. Diane may be going down in flames but she certainly wasn’t going alone!

But Ricky’s employer couldn’t prove that he’d done this. They called his office a couple of times. But they got nowhere. Ricky was smart enough to operate the acquired company under its original name. Soon however, Ricky was relieved of his part-time gig. Unless, a company arranged an Enron-like bifurcation of subsidiaries, ferreting out the true ownership of any venture would take just a little digging.

Whew! Is your head spinning too?

Not to worry. Let’s take a breather. I’ll finish this story in Part II of “The Case Of The Missing Equity!”

By that time I hope your head-spinning, and dizziness, will have subsided.

 

Blake Glenn shares his looney perspectives, stories, and mis-adventures in The Looney Executive blog. He has interviewed hundreds (or at least tens) of people via  The Looney Executive Podcasts and former TV show. He’s the founder of a tech group called IgniteTech, and claims to be a direct descendant of the original Looney Executive – Because there must be SOME explanation … right?

If you dare, I can be reached the old school way … blake@LooneyExecutive.com

 

P.S.  I’m actively recruiting test contestants for my business game show experiment. Interested? Please contact me so I can add you to the player pool!

 

Business Is Big Business in the TV Business!
Oct 9th, 2015 by LOONEYEXECUTIVE

Blake Glenn’s Looney thoughts, perspectives, and insights on the world of business!

— by Blake Glenn

 

Don’t look now.
Business is going big time in the entertainment industry.
Well at least on TV.

Business is having a big time moment, maybe even unprecedented in terms of the hours devoted to business programming. There may be more scripted and reality shows about business on the air right now than ever in the existence of the small screen. Now of course I don’t know this to be an absolute fact. But I think it’s entirely within the realm of possibility.

Here’s a quick look at the current landscape where business is front and center on TV:

Fictional Shows

Silicon Valley

This well-received HBO show has completed at least two seasons now. It’s a satire, or parody, of life in Silicon Valley. I mean it’s about life in a tech startup – not life as a cab driver of hotel worker or accountant working in Silicon Valley. And I’ve read that it’s pretty good. But I don’t have HBO. I have TV. And since HBO is not TV …

 

Empire

This tantalizing Fox juggernaut crashed the network scene in 2014 and has been on a rampage ever since. From the pieces I’ve seen, I’d say it’s about 1/5 biz story, 1/5 soap opera, and 3/5 total and complete insanity. It’s the urban culture of hip hop meets the cowboy, back-stabbing, devious culture of Dallas (the TV show, not the city) … set in the music industry!

 

Halt and Catch Fire

This show is set in Texas and follows the adventures of a group of computer entrepreneurs in the 1980s. Having been around during the early days of the PC industry, I’ve found the premise alone to be fairly interesting. But having it set in Texas instead of Silicon Valley makes it fascinating.

 

Blood and Oil

This new series about oil would seem to be yet another knock-off of the original Dallas series. I’ve not seen an episode yet. But if the trailers are any indication, we’re in for a real steamy, sexy, oily, back-stabbing mess. But even the recent Dallas spinoff – also called Dallas, just updated – didn’t last more than 2 or 3 seasons. So Blood and Oil’s prospects may hit a dry well. But maybe if it’s set on the North Dakota frontier, around a small town experiencing a boom because of newly discovered shell oil together with natural gas fracking, and shows a litany of modern day wild west type characters … maybe, just maybe we’ve got ourselves a hit!

 

Reality Shows

American Greed

This standard has given us dozens of tales built around the power and, ultimately, the repercussions of unbridled greed. What strikes me is how every single one of the featured greed-meisters has been able to sucker so many people. So many people that would seem to be reasonably intelligent, though some have been from the vulnerable elderly population. This show always reminds me of a book I saw a few years ago called “Snakes in Suits”. Sociopaths and psychopaths are all around us … beware.

The show also reinforces the old adage:

Never. Ever. Never. Put all of your money in one friggin’ basket. Got it?

 

Shark Tank

Enough said. Don’t watch it? You’re dead to me!

 

West Texas Investors Club

Apparently actor Matthew McConaughey has a brother with a lot of money. And this brother has a business partner that also has a lot of money. And together they take pitches at their Texas digs. And after grilling the fund-seeker in their own West Texas style accent, they then decide whether or not to invest. Sometimes they even have the entrepreneur get drunk and spend the night.

In fairness though, the product being pitched in that case was supposed to be a cure for hangovers. It’s not hard to imagine this item in demand in West Texas and at college campuses across the country. Oh yea. Then there’s that third guy. I’m not sure his role. He got drunk and spent the night handcuffed to the entrepreneur with the alleged hangover cure. I really, really don’t want to know what happened that night.

 

Bazillion Dollar Club

This series, airing on the SyFy channel, features 6 startups as they try to get their ventures into the air. It also features a couple of apparently well-known tech startup players who coach them – 500 Startups’ Dave McClure and Highway1’s Brady Forrest. As the title indicates, it’s no longer enough to get into the billion dollar club. Now you must go big and reach for BAZZILLIOOOONNN!

Update: Looks like we have our first casualty of the new group of shows. SyFY has decided not to air any more episodes after the initial episode aired on Sept 21st. The ratings must have been pretty bad for that to happen. It looks like the producers are seeking another home so they can show (or “burn off” in TV terms … I’m an insider to the biz) the remaining 5 episodes. I have a suggestion – Youtube, Vimeo, or Crackle. Well actually I guess that’s 3 suggestions.

 

Startup U.

This entry, airing on ABC Family, follows the adventures of 10 students of Draper University. This program, run by VC Tim Draper, appears to be an intensive 7-week accelerator. So apparently the cameras will try to capture the competition among these 10 super-ambitious people. According to the description, all of them will have the opportunity to pitch for dollars.
The Profit

This one is different. It’s had at least 2 seasons on CNBC. Instead of focusing on startups, it features one investor, Marcus Lemonis, trying to help small business owners turn around their mini-empires. I’ve seen these business owners. I’ve known them. I’ve advised them. This is a hard gig. In addition to advice, Lemonis invests his own money with a handshake. Sometimes owners listen. Many times they don’t. And sometimes Lemonis gets burned.

 

Make Me A Millionaire Inventor

No. I will not. But maybe buyers will. This CNBC show connects inventors with engineers and scientists to see if their invention has possibilities and, if so, to help with the commercialization process. Not all of them will make it. But for those that do maybe a few million isn’t farfetched at all.

 

Bar Rescue

This Spike TV show has been around about 4 years. It features a big, gruff consultant with a NY/NJ accent that tries to help struggling bar and restaurant owners to turnaround their failing ventures. I’ve watched about a half dozen episodes. The show’s format seems to consistently work like this:

1) The consultant and his team performs undercover recon on the bar to get an unfiltered look at the problems

2) The consultant and his team make recommendations to the owner(s) – menu items, decor, employees, management … etc.

3) The owners don’t like the recommendations and battle with said consultant and team

4) There’s lots of screaming and crying

5) Owner(s) concede they need help (but no concession for a therapist) and agree to changes

6) Changes and re-decorations made – usually in 5 minutes. The team and his consultants must be made up of super human speedsters

7) The owners and staff review changes – get mad, get happy, both

8) Bar reopens with changes and entertains a large crowd

However, it’s not all hugs and kisses. As I read the Wikipedia page I saw that many of these bars had failed anyway. And in one extreme case, an angry owner shot and killed a man in his bar after the bar was transformed, but before the episode was aired.

 

There may be a few other shows out there. It’s not an exhaustive list. And by the time you read this, another show or two may have been cancelled. But I can’t worry about that right now. I’m off to begin work on a series of TV show ideas I’ve kicked around for a while. Now, obviously, is the time to strike. Now where did I put Spielberg’s number. He said to call anytime.

 

Blake Glenn shares his looney perspectives, stories, and mis-adventures in The Looney Executive blog. He has interviewed hundreds (or at least tens) of people via  The Looney Executive Podcasts and former TV show. He’s the founder of a tech group called IgniteTech, and claims to be a direct descendant of the original Looney Executive – Because there must be SOME explanation … right?

 

If you dare, he can be reached the old school way … blake@LooneyExecutive.com

 

The Business of Chicken Wings
Aug 13th, 2015 by LOONEYEXECUTIVE

Blake Glenn’s Looney thoughts, perspectives, and insights on the world of business!

 

Somehow I missed it. I’m not sure how. I feel so bad.

You see I recently learned that July 29th was National Chicken Wing Day. There’s a day to honor chicken wings. As well it should be. If there was any food that should be honored it most certainly is chicken wings. They are the Subaru of food. Fairly inexpensive. Versatile. Good for most any occasion. Liked by many. A food utility vehicle. Off road, on road, you name it.

I love chicken wings. Absolutely love ’em, love ’em. love ’em!

Each year I make a significant personal contribution to the chicken wing consumption index. So I don’t know how this truly blessed day escaped me. It’s escaped me since 1977, when the inaugural national Chicken Wing Day made its debut in Buffalo, NY. This day even has its own web site.

Nationalchickenwingday.com

 

Like me, I know you’re so excited to learn more about the history of chicken wings. So here’s a brief history according to the web site:

 

CHICKEN WING HISTORY

Buffalo, New York lays claim to the birthplace of the chicken wing and that’s why they are often called Buffalo wings as well. The story goes that Teressa Bellissimo created chicken wings at the Anchor Bar, which she owned with her husband Frank, when her son Dominic and some of his college friends decided they wanted a late night bite to eat.

She wanted a fast and easy dish so she deep-fried some chicken wings, which in 1964 were usually reserved for soup stock. She tossed them in butter and hot sauce. Naturally, they were an instant hit. The Bellissimos weren’t the first Buffalo restaurateurs to realize the potential of chicken wings. John Young had opened Wings’n Things on Jefferson Avenue in 1963. But his wings were breaded and dressed in a tomato-based sauce.

 

Now we know the origins story of this superhero of foods. Yes. Chicken wings are superheroes. There should be a comic book. Graphic novel. Animated series. Live action TV series. Merchandise. And eventually a big budget tent pole movie franchise. Their biggest super power is versatility. They can go:

  • Deep fried
  • Grilled
  • Sauteed
  • Satay
  • Baked
  • Broiled
  • Smoked
  • Spicy
  • Mild
  • Medium
  • Crispy
  • Regular
  • Jack Daniels

… And on, and on, and on!

 

No other superhero has that kind of power. Not Iron Man. Not Super Girl. Not Wonder Woman. Not Batman. Yet, The Chicken Wing lives a relatively quietly unsung life until called into action.

Chicken wings are big business too. Over 27 billion wings were gobbled down in 2013. Well over 1.2 billion wings were eaten just during the last Super Bowl weekend. That’s the biggest single wing consumption period by far. What many people don’t know is that the Super Bowl is actually a big chicken wing party and celebration. You know. You go to a glorious wing party and a football game breaks out as side entertainment. Maybe you watch the game a little. But it’s not the main event by any stretch. The guests of honor are always Mr. and Mrs. Wing.

So when it comes to chicken wings …

Admire them.

Celebrate them.

Honor them.

But most of all … Eat them.

Eat the hell out of them!

 

Blake Glenn shares his looney perspectives, stories, and mis-adventures in The Looney Executive blog. He has interviewed hundreds (or at least tens) of people via  The Looney Executive Podcasts and former TV show. He’s the founder of a tech group called IgniteTech, and claims to be a direct descendant of the original Looney Executive – Because there must be SOME explanation … right?

If you dare, he can be reached the old school way … blake@LooneyExecutive.com

—————————————————————

P.S. – If you’re really interested in growing the tech startup scene in SW Ohio, you’ll want to join the IgniteTech Meetup Group.  Join the group. Come out to our events. Bring your energy and ideas. Build your connections.

Join us on this adventure. And help us to create a great story!

 

 

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